Shawarma and Falafel

Shawarma_FalafelShawarma and Falafel are traditional dishes of Syria. Although both are famous in the neighborhood, they are best served in Syria.

The two videos below were shooted by my camera while in Syria / Damascus – 2010.

Bon Appétit

Shawarma:

Grilled lamp or chicken…

Falafel:

Fried chickpeas & ground beans with spices – Vegetarian dish

Have you got a chance to try Shawarma and/or Falafel?

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26 thoughts on “Shawarma and Falafel

  1. Carolyn Page

    Yes and yes, Mohamad. Both are delicious! We have many cafes and restaurants of this kind in Australia. We are so fortunate to have many country’s cuisines right at our fingertips. I know what you are going to say: They probably aren’t as good as those served in Syria/Damascus. But, don’t let the proprietors of those business here in Oz hear you say that. I’m sure they would be very offended! 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Mohamad Al Karbi Post author

      Thank you, Carolyn, for the advice 🙂 I can feel what you’re talking about. Even here, in Qatar (which is an Arab country), the Syrian restaurants are not very similar to the ones in Syria. I think it’s normal thing. After all, the core is very similar. I once tried Falafel in Venice/Italy! I wish to visit Australia someday…

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    1. Mohamad Al Karbi Post author

      Thank you Linda, I’d be more than happy to invite you all for Syrian dishes… The toppings in Falafel in general are pickles (cucumber and turnip), Tahina (sesame sauce), yogurt, parsley, tomato, lettuce, cucumber, and fresh mint. In addition to some spices – mainly Summak (rhus). I hope you can find them. I’ve heard from some friends in USA that they buy some Syrian stuffs from Amazon but not sure if food is there!

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      1. mainepaperpusher

        That sounds wonderful!! I wasn’t sure what Summak was and I looked it up. That spice comes from what we call Summac and I have it growing in my yard! I had never, ever heard of it being used as a spice. Here it can be rather invasive, but I love the red leaves in the fall. That is sooo cool!

        Like

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