Staying strong in the face of rejection

Life sets us up for a fail. From the get-go we’re taught that the hero always wins, the princess will get her prince and fortune favours the bold.

What we’re not taught is the reality; life, sometimes, stinks.

Sometimes you don’t win. Sometimes the prince gets away. Sometimes you get your butt whopped by life.

And to no other cohort does this happen more regularly to than the ‘Creative’. By the ‘Creative’ I am of course referring to the delicate writer, the intuitive actor, the graceful dancer, the trusting songstress, even the daring freelance accountant. Whomsoever you may be, you are a ‘Creative’ and you live in a magical fairy-filled world where good always triumphs. Which makes it oh-so more difficult when you face reality’s hard truth;

Sometimes, you will be rejected.

By whom? The editor who knocks back your manuscript. The make-or-break acting gig that goes to someone else. The record label that turns down your demo tape. The firm who only take juniors with twenty years of experience and a portfolio of existing clients. Rejection, rejection, rejection.

But my little ‘Creative’ ones, I’m here to bring you hope.

Do. Not. Give. Up.

Yes, you will be rejected in life. Because that is life. What you need to remember is that rejection happens to you. Rejection is not you.

There are a myriad of reasons why you might have been rejected; the editor in charge of reading your manuscript had a headache and only glossed over your work. The casting director in charge of hiring the star for the new commercial gave the part to her cousin instead of you. Or maybe, just maybe, your work wasn’t good enough this time. But that doesn’t mean you give up.

It means, rejection has happened to you. You as a human being, were not rejected.

You as a human being are not rejected.

You are not rejected.

Go forth. Do not give up.

Reject rejection.

*I am a writer and frequently rejected. In a stunning turn of events, and to prove my point [never give up] I was asked by the very talented Mohamad Al Karbi, to guest blog. I took this as my chance to share my motto with everyone else out there. Go forth. Do not give up!

For more writing hints and to view my creative writing head to jessicabakkers.com

Many thanks to Mohamah Al Karbi for having me!

This entry was posted in Other Topics and tagged , , , on by .

About Jessica Bakkers

Do you need a word? Or maybe more than just one? Do you need a string of words to tell a tale? A collage of words to paint a picture? A polished piece of prose to entice readers to your website? Then let me help. I am a self-confessed wordsmith and I am willing and eager to freelance write for you. I am a creative and freelance writer with over twenty years of writing experience. I have ghost-written novels in the genres of fantasy / romance and paranormal / romance, however my genre of choice when it comes to writing for myself is dark fantasy where I can allow myself to fully explore the anti-hero characters that pepper my stories. I dabble at poetry and write professionally for clients locally and internationally. My first full-length novel, Guns of Perdition, will be released in December 2017. My major love affair is with the written word; specifically creative writing. I allow myself to indulge and rendezvous with this secret lover whenever time allows… and then we make beautiful poetry together!

46 thoughts on “Staying strong in the face of rejection

  1. Adam

    It is easy to receive rejection as a negative. We all want to be accepted, but rejection and failure can also be called a setback, and I think that’s a much easier word to stomach.
    I once attended a panel of publishers and editors, and one of them talked about their own experience as someone who has to deliver those “rejection letters”. They talked about guilt, and wanting to encourage the aspiring author, but they also felt their own frustration that so many read their letter in the wrong tone.

    “All too often I offer feedback, constructive suggestions for how to improve upon the story, but instead of working with me, they rage against me, telling me all the reasons why ‘It is good enough’ and how I’m ‘going to regret it when someone else says yes,’ but the truth is, nothing would make me happier. All a rejection letter really means is ‘We can’t sell this.”
    It was really touching, and a powerful lesson on perspective.

    And I think your point is well made. They rejected the story, not the author. One of the most common pieces of advice I hear is “as soon as you submit one story, start another. Then, if the first one gets rejected, now you have two stories to submit.” And, referencing another article I read, writing more stories helps us to become less attached to any one, which can take some of the sting out of the setback.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Jessica Bakkers Post author

      I love the idea of seeing the rejection letter from the other side! I never thought about the editors / agents / publishers who have to send them out, especially to the writers they thoughts had something nearly perfect to offer but just needed a little something else doing to it. This will stick with me for a while.

      Your point about starting another story when you submit is something I already do. I have a bunch of short stories and poetry that ‘do the rounds’ so to speak. If I get a knockback here, tomorrow I send it there! (After the obligatory ugly crying session of course). 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Mystery Blogger Award – Jessica Bakkers

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s